William Hedgcock

William Hedgcock

Associate Professor
Marketing

Education:

  • BA 1996
    Economics Macalester College
  • BA 1996
    Psychology Macalester College
  • Ph.D. 2008
    Business University of Minnesota

Expertise:

  • Neuromarketing
  • Decision Neuroscience
  • Judgment and Decision Making
  • Choice Biases
  • Decision Making in Aging

Biography

William Hedgcock is an Associate Professor in the Marketing Department at the University of Minnesota, Carlson School of Management. His teaching and research focuses on consumer behavior and the neuroscience of choice. Professor Hedgcock’s research utilizes a range of techniques from simple paper and pencil preference questionnaires to physiological measures and functional brain imaging. His primary research stream involves identifying cognitive declines that affect financial decisions in seniors and the physiological and neural correlates of these declines and has been has  published in journals such as the Journal of Marketing Research, Neuropsychology, Management Science, Psychological Science, and the Journal of Consumer Psychology

Prior to Carlson, Professor Hedgcock was an Associate Professor and Director of the Marketing PhD Program at the University of Iowa, Tippie College of Business. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota, Carlson School of Management in 2008.


Selected Works & Activities.

  • Journal Articles
    Park, J., Lu, F., and Hedgcock, W. (2017), “Relative Effects of Forward and Backward Planning on Goal Pursuit,” Psychological Science, 28(11), 1620-1630.
  • Journal Articles
    Koestner, B., Hedgcock, W., Halfmann, K., and Denburg, N. (2016), “The Role of the Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex in Purchase Intent among Older Adults,” Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 8, 1-8.
  • Journal Articles
    Hedgcock, W., Rao, R., and Chen, A. (2016), “Choosing to Choose: The Effects of Decoys and Prior Choice on Deferral,” Management Science, 62(10), 2952-2976.
  • Journal Articles
    Park, J. and Hedgcock, W. (2016), “Thinking Concretely or Abstractly: The Influence of Fit between Goal Progress and Goal Construal on Subsequent Self-Regulation,” Journal of Consumer Psychology, 26(3), 395-409.
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