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CHRLS Alumna Gives Back With Case Scenario

January 3, 2013

Alumni of the MA-HRIR program at the Carlson School of Management give back to their alma mater in a variety of ways.

Alumni of the MA-HRIR program at the Carlson School of Management give back to their alma mater in a variety of ways. Some volunteer on committees and task forces; others serve as mentors; still others support student fellowships.

Nicole Luniewski, '10 MA-HRIR, People and Organizational Capability Consultant at Microsoft, helped give first-year students real-world experience with a Microsoft Business Case Scenario.

The case scenario, led by Luniewski in conjunction with Professors Colleen Manchester and Theresa Glomb, taught students about talent development of key talent in sales, marketing and Services Group at Microsoft.

"Partnering with a company exposes students to real business issues that are fraught with ambiguity, uncertainty, and influence, and is the ultimate way to hone the tools they have been learning," said Manchester, who teaches "Using Data and Metrics in HRIR".

The students were given a background on how Microsoft thinks about Talent Management of employees with the ability, commitment, and aspiration for future leadership roles in the company and were then asked to provide insight to the situation.

"It was a fantastic experience to have a fresh set of intelligent and eager students focused on some talent management activities we are working on," Luniewski said.

Luniewski said the experience with the Microsoft Business Case Scenario is one many students will encounter in their internships and careers.

"[In HR] You are given a problem, a limited amount of time to solve, and not the exact information you might want, but still need to come prepared to your leadership to propose ideas and solutions," she said.

Glomb, who teaches "Staffing, Training and Development," believes case studies such as the Microsoft Business Case Scenario are the best way to gain real-world experience.

"Analyzing HR situations is complex and there is really no better way to develop these skills than by thinking about real organizational problems," Glomb said. "Nicole really brought the issues to life in her presentation and discussion with our students."

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